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Oct 15, 2014

Contents

Heart of the City Festival

11th Annual Downtown Eastside Heart of the City Festival
Wednesday October 29 - Sunday November 9,2014

We are excited to begin our second decade with the 11th annual festival. This year's theme, 'Keeping the home fires burning,' is inspired by DTES residents and artists. Just a few events for your interest -
PRE-FESTIVAL WORKSHOPS - Free
Big House Workshops
Thursday, Oct 16· Autumn Leaf Mobiles and Light-Carrier Making, llam-3pm Aboriginal Front Door, 384 Main
Light-Carrier Making, with Cultural Sharing S:30pm-8pm Carnegie Theatre
Yellow Roses and a Cup of Tea, with Oppenheimer Park Ladies Tea Party, 2pm- 4pm, Carnegie Art Room, 401 Main

Performance Workshops
Tues Oct 21, Wed Oct 22, Thurs Oct 23, Tues Oct 28, 1:30pm-4:30pm & Fri Oct 24, 12:30pm-2:30pm
Indian Acts! Coming to the Fire, with Margo Kane and Full Circle: First Nations Performance. Everyone welcome. Carnegie Gym
FESTIVAL PICKS - Oct 29 to Nov 1
1. FESTIVAL OPENING CEREMONY - Join friends from the neighbourhood and special guests for the grand opening of our 11" annual festival! Guest performers: Sam George of the Squamish Nation; Mike Dangeli of the Git Hayetsk Dancers; emerging rising stars Jamie Elliott and Hannah Walker as Twin Bandit; and The Carnegie Jazz Band, led by trombonist Brad Muirhead, will play Sandstone Lody, Patrick Foley's moving tribute to Carnegie, sung by the Carnegie Choir led by Mike Richter.
Wed Oct 29, 2pm sharp, Carnegie Theatre, everyone welcome! Refreshments. Free

2. OPENING - CONTEMPORARY QUILTS- Come to the opening reception! Diane Wood offers a show of mixed media fabric pieces that tell stories and relate to current issues of the community.
Wed Oct 29, Spm-6pm, InterUrban Gallery, 1 E. Hastings. Free
3. HOT JAZZ AT THE CARNEGIE! - The Carnegie Jazz Band returns! Led by multi-instrumentalist and composer Brad Muirhead. Join the band for an evening of jazz standards, original songs by Brad Muirhead and members of the band. including a new jazz tune by Festival producer Terry Hunter. With special guest, local jazz-man Brian Harding on trombone. Wed Oct 29, 7:30pm, Carnegie Theatre. Free
4. THE RAYMUR MOTHERS: Pay-what-you-can Preview! - Produced by Theatre in the Raw, an original full-length musical written by Bob Sarti, music by Bill Sample, directed by Jay Hamburger. The play tells the story of single mothers from the Raymur Place Social Housing Project in the 1970s who succeeded in their fight to have an overpass built to enable their children to walk safely to school.
Preview: Wednesday Oct 29, 8pm, pay what you can, Russian Hall, 800 Campbell.
Run: Thursday Oct 30 to Sunday Nov 9 (no shows on Nov 3 & 4). Ticket info: www.theatreintheraw.ca

5. 2ND STORY: BLOOD ALLEY - Over sixty personal stories from the area of "Blood Alley' have been gathered, documented and nine were crafted into short videos by The Only Animal. Come and see a selection of these videos. Thurs Oct 30, S:30pm-8pm, InterUrban Gallery, 1 E. Hastings. Free
6. LOUIS RIEL'S 170TH BIRTHDAY PARTY - Share music, stories and history of Louis Riel and the Metis people of Canada with Bill Beauregarde, Harmony of Nations, dancer Yvonne Chartrand and fiddler Kathleen Nisbett. Coffee and dessert by donation.
Thurs Oct 30, 7pm-9pm, Floral & Hardy, 688 E. Hastings. Free
7. HALLOWE'EN DANCE & COSTUME PARTY - Put on your most frightful face and join in the dance! SeaSmoke (Peggy Wilson, Rose Eide, Murray Black, Russell Styles, Robert Inglis) plays for you to dance! Fri Oct 31, 7pm-9:4Spm, Carnegie Theatre. Free
8. Keepers of the Flame: A Daylong Celebration of Poetry at Carnegie!
All day Soturday November 1. Free
10am-12pm • Slam Poetry Workshop, with Sho Wiley, Carnegie 3,d floor classroom 1pm-2:30pm' Carnegie's 2"" Poetry Slam!, with MC Jillian Christmas, Carnegie Theatre 1:30pm-3pm' Poetree, with Madgelanye, Carnegie sidewalk under the tent
3pm-Spm .     • A Celebration of Bud Osborn, Carnegie Theatre
6pm-10pm • Shrines for Day of the Dead, Carnegie sidewalk
7pm-9:4Spm' DTES Poets Open Mic, hosted by Diane Wood, Carnegie Theatre
Many more FREE exciting events during the upcoming days of the Festival!
For complete event details, pick up the Festival Program Guide at the Carnegie Front Desk or visit www.heartofthecityfestival.com.
Produced by Vancouver Moving Theatre w/Carnegie Community Centre & Association of United Ukrainian Canadians and fifty community partners.

[top]

Kelly

Kelly,
Here she comes in her purple cart.
Her great warm smile giving to each, their day a great start.
Her face may be grey but she would not allow that to get in her way.
She was up at dawn each and every day.
Off to the Carnegie she would head.  
Not laying about ill in her bed.
There was work to do and she knew that true.  
And she did her part.
With her great kind heart.
Marching against homelessness,
Marching for the rights of women,
Helping out at the learning centre.
Her time was freely given.
She lived a life bold and true,
Doing things few of us ever dare to do.
Living up the West Coast on a boat, a woman alone.
Is nothing done by the weak of heart
For woman's lib she lived her part.
I only knew her in her golden years,
Though her health was poor she never shed tears.
But I could see in her face a beauty that years before,
Would have prompted many a man to want to further explore.
Hers was a beauty from the inside out.
A kind one seldom sees running about.
Her purple cart will no more light up the Carnegie's door.  
For she has gone on to other realms to further explore.
Your photo upon the "Carnegie Hall of Fame"
Makes sure that none who knew you will forget your name.
Although we say adieu with pain.
Memories of your kindness and smile we'll recall again and again.  
We will not forget too soon
the image of your smile brightening up a room. 
                                                                  -Colleen Carroll


[top]

Dear Kelly
Dear Kelly,
  Colleen let us know yesterday that you had had your final struggle. We were all shocked & stunned because we did not know you had been ill (& much too young). However, I like to think you are just on another journey, and somehow are aware of us here at Carnegie.
  I remember one Xmas I gave you something – a piece of jewellery. You gave me a cute little black & white penguin pin.
  Once when we were alone is the Learning Centre, you told me about your life on Vancouver Island, & that you chose to move to give your son more educational opportunities. We heard you were called “Captain Kelly” because you actually had lived on a houseboat at one time. And as a receptionist in the Learning Centre you could always be depended upon.
  Poetry Night wasn’t complete without your smiling & sometimes very to-the-point poetry as you called attention to the many injustices the poor suffer - particularly the people from our neighbourhood (DTES)
  You will be sorely missed Kelly, and I see you in  your purple & blue khakis scooting across ways that someday we will all encounter.
May the Great Spirit Smile on You.
                          All my relations,
                                        Wilhelmina

[top]

Word Vancouver September 28, 2014
Word Vancouver   September 28, 2014
Carnegie Community Centre & Library Table
   -277 interactions:
E  , illustrious librarian (who now comes to Carnegie just once a week) and closet genius, succeeded again! She joins Lisa David & I at the Carnegie table with a unique and engaging interactive game each year that makes children glow. It also makes any wandering adult that a kid has to keep track of stand by & learn.
With a table of the elements, you first put down your birth year or day, found the matching Atomic Number and then, for a personal contribution, put down, from your own Table of Contents & Table of Discontents wrote down what makes you content & what makes you discontented. A collection of answers follows:
Atomic number: Range of participants' Year of birth:
1943 -2009
Table of Contents:  Thumbs up (72 entries):
 Sushi, books (the most entries), ebooks,  books(not ebooks),  paper books.., free wifi, letter writing, volunteers, Mac and cheese,  diversity, my little pony, yoga, flowers, reading, literacy, trees,  peace and justice, the library, Christmas opening, amazing staff, East Van, giants (2 entries), science, music cds, pizza, ice cream, animals, quarterback, old tyme radio, holidays, sad songs, sahaj yoga, DVD, connecting, Humphrey (cartoon character), writing, poetry (2  entries), soup, independence, broccoli, dogs, Word Vancouver, cereal,  good reads, cats, recycling, sunny weather, recorder, math...
Table of DisContents:  Thumbs down (67 entries):
Hurt, Not being heard, Tomatoes (2 entries), Harper (2 entries), bullies (2 entries), cigarette butts on sidewalk, Dentist, Chinese classes(from a young , Chinese girl), Flu, Durian, stinky cheese, homelessness, hate, boredom, dropping ice cream on the sidewalk, rude
people, market fundamentalism, skunks, violence, asbaragus (asparagus), wastefulness, discarding books at vpl, fake people, apathy, when people say they don't like dogs, animal cruelty, pollution, tickling, hunters, minimum wages, fluorescent light, pineapple, cars that don't signal, totalitarian capitalism, homework, misogeny, traffic, standing...
We were probably far & away the most visited table there (not that having a bowl of lifesavers didn’t help draw adults away from their stressed kids… sigh)
                                                              PRT

[top]

From the Library

From the Library

  Everyone has a story to share and we have a good mix of bios, from celebrities to everyday people who either find themselves in extraordinary situations or simply want to share a slice of their life. The library clusters most biographies in the 921 section, but you can also find them throughout non-fiction (ie. singers in the music section). Give me a shout if there’s someone you would like to research, take a browse on the shelves, or consider the titles below.
  As well, there’s been interest in bringing back the “Main & Hastings Book Club,” with the idea that participants meet-up monthly and showcase their favourite book or author... Does this interest you?  Thanks for the feedback.
                         Your Carnegie Librarian, Natalie

Not Yet by Wayson Choy (921 Cho)
Best known for his book The Jade Peony, Canadian writer Choy reveals how his community connections sustained him while being hospitalized and near death on two occasions.  The book is “an intimate and insightful study of one man’s reason for living.”
Edge of the Sound:  Memoirs of a West Cost Log Salvager by Jo Hammond (921 H226a)
In 1967 Jo Hammond was 25 years old and had never heard of log salvaging, but soon decided to quit her job and be part of the community along the Sunshine Coast.  She shares stories of chasing logs, rescuing boaters, finding her place in the world, and raising a family.
A.Y. Jackson:  The Life of a Landscape Painter by Wayne Larsen (921 J 1241La)
Over 70 years Jackson travelled the country sketching and painting the landscapes and communities he encountered.  Jackson is described as an “artist, outdoorsman, soldier, teacher, debater, writer and outspoken defender of modern art.”  The book includes colour plates of his work, historic photos and detailed accounts of his life.    
Not About the Medal
by Leah Pells (921 P392a)
Local long-distance runner and 3-time Olympian, Pells reflects on growing up in a single-parent home of an alcoholic, the challenges of addiction, and the outlet of sport.  “Leah speaks bravely about a widespread disease while delivering a message of hope.  Turning hardship into inspiration, she also shows readers how to lead a life of Olympic proportions no matter what your beginnings.”

[top]

SLAM POETRY & CARNEGIE’S 2nd POETRY SLAM!
SLAM POETRYWorkshop with Sho Wiley
* Saturday November 1, 10am – 12pm
* Carnegie 3rd floor Classroom, 401 Main

  In anticipation of Carnegie’s 2nd Poetry Slam! Sho Wiley, creative writing instructor and long-time slam poet, leads a workshop where she’ll share advice and techniques. Poetry is best when read aloud, even performed. Microphone technique, body language, gestures and more. Bring two of your favourite poems or write one in the workshop; you’ll get an opportunity to try out your slam poetry ideas and with one-on-one mentoring you’ll be ready to step up and go for it! “Poetry is meant to be heard, poetry for the people!” says Sho and who knows that better than the poets of Carnegie! Free
:   “Drop-in is fine; Pre-registration is better!
               (Don’t let your own greatness daunt you!!)

CARNEGIE’S 2nd POETRY SLAM!
* Saturday November 1, 1pm – 2:30pm
* Carnegie Theatre, 401 Main

In celebration of the Carnegie Newsletter and its long history of encouraging writers and poets in the Downtown Eastside, and in honour of the late, much loved friend and extraordinary talent Zaccheus Jackson (he hosted & performed at the first Slam! in 2013), we present Carnegie’s 2nd Poetry Slam!
Have you slammed a poem before? You’ll have three minutes to say your poem. Memorize it, improvise it, rant or sing it out. Then five random audience members chosen to judge will give you a score. The rules have still to be decided, so be prepared for surprises. Featured host and MC is Jillian Christmas. Be part of the audience – laugh, cheer, cry, clap – or step up and slam it, you know you want to! Free

[top]

The Primitive Moments

The Primitive Moments
  Now if conclusion jumping & trash dumping were Olympic sports or a fueless plane trying to land on an active volcano too much bullshit clogging up our courts’ vanishing skills is this country’s middle name; jobs & living quarters for the poor make too much sense no more meandering on that selfishist picket fence still there will always be room for some innocent who will unwillingly take the blame, they don’t call you Head of Security when you lock & bolt that glass every nite your nightmares & fears are also hers to tuck you in nice & tight humiliation & animosity stick with you thru bad & worse, we grab our coffee a little cream ‘no poison for me’ off to start another dismal yet extraordinary day they agree I am once again blessed with the depressionary demolition curse, like the Pope joining a Satanic cult or Catholics bearing & soon to be using guns now isn’t that an insult to your Maker (whomever that might be), after a lifetime of non-lavish spending the primitive moments eventually appear your face grows longer with the blitz attacks of advancing years if I held my mind shut I would sink to the bottom of the darkest sea; I remember shooting down all those stars but like depression they return every nite even when they came back the next night they brought planets with them like a big brother who evens the scars carrying this truth freight got to be quite a chore, Hugh and Anna made such a cute couple yet their problems become your troubles but every nite I look at those same stars and you know something I never get bored, it’s a long way back to civilisation against the flow of traffic on Nightmare Drive it becomes so slow every second someone taking your right to be alive Selling is Believing! told you so!! The Grand Closing is closed for business the customers don’t care as windows soon become doors joy & happiness are never ever there only contempt rewind me when to jump overboard they’ve been closing down our light ever since the first findings of coal, I was brought up to expect less than stellar expectations to always watch listen & learn If you really want to know how it all ends you ‘ll just have to wait your turn in these days of the stars with standouts like Alison Redford (gone!) nd Christy Clark (not yet) pathetic imitations of leaders long gone like do they really care about kids losing 3 weeks of education not funny at all, artificial life is soon to show up.. show off.. then take over the human drones with a holster for all your gadgets leash and phones take me back to the beautiful prehistoric times when you never had to hold your breath let alone have anything under it Back to the present hoping there’s a future for the next generation or maybe there really is no future at all.

                                By ROBERT McGILLIVRAY
Injustice is relatively easy to bear; what stings is justice.”   
                                                             -H.L.Mencken

[top]

HEARTBEAT

HEARTBEAT

You poor soul
Caught in a covering of skin
Seems to be decaying everything within!
Your fleshy muscles of youth
Skin shares the wear and tear of age
Storms of stress undress my youthful smile
Face has scars from torments and trials
Leaving only lines as signs
Heart starts to pound moments of stillness away.
Shake the cold of growing old
Quietly fading away to the beat
Racing up and down my spine
Out of strength to move my resting bones
Towards the ringing phone
Catching my breath, stretching my limbs
Go to phone, only to say
No one’s home!
                                 Todd W Amos

[top]

down here

down here

sunshine
on downtown eastside sidewalks
glows fresh crimson
like rose petals fallen
from ransacked gardens of the brokenhearted
from those who wear the violent evenings
     on faces bruised black & purple
     whose teeth are kicked through panicked mouths
     begging mercy
     whose sight is slash-blinded by knives of darkness
     inside murdered souls
     whose lives are worn-out demolitions
     in screaming alleys
     of vomit & unending misfortunes
&  for those who fall or get pushed or raving leap
    from caged-in hotel windows
    of desperation & hate & grief
    in a greedy rapacious city
&  for those lining up more patient than saints
    in cold rain & crow shit
    impaled by exhaust of the oblivious
    to receive crusts of bread
&  for those sniffing glue
    beside railroad tracks of uselessness
    to derail their birthplace renovated into exile
&  for those plunging needles
    through veins seeking ecstasy
    but flowing with nervous shame & misery
&  for those whose scared runaway skin
    is sold without hope
    to hypocrisy’s ghosts
&  for those cheated by political schemes
    & drown in tidal waves of unknown committees
&  for those hardened like steel
    by the arson of their childhoods’
    gentle visionary love of the real
&  for refugees pouring from the earth’s economic wars
    refugees fleeing wars in the roots of their hair
&  for those straightjacketed into numbers & things
    whose withered spirits don’t interest
    the scientific god who has forsaken them
&  for those smelling & looking like death
    staggering through whirling neon vertigos
    of east hastings
    & whose leering faces are scarred with rejection
&  for those run over by monstrous rush-hours
    of mountains & skyscrapers of enormous wealth
    & who get busted for jaywalking
    a puddle of small debt
&  for those whose lungs are wrecked
    in a quicksand
    of malnourished infested tubercular rent
&  for those eaten by fears sending them reeling
    from a breeze turning a corner
    or a shadow thrown over them
    reminding them of all they’ve tried to forget
&  for those whose inarticulate cries for help
    are thrown out like garbage
    arrived from hell
&  for those who survive on what’s tossed aside
    into gutters of abundance denied
    & no way to live
    & are somewhere naked & shaking
    with a life no one else coulod endure
&  for those who are loneliness frozen in tiny rooms
    & whose mental rainbows of aliveness & joy
    are sucked dry by fragmenting screens
    of colour teevees
&  for those overdosed on jealousy & bitterness
    for what might’ve been
    for the bad luck decades that’ve bitten them
    & whose frustrations carve wounds
    inside & out
&  for those whose unshed tears are choking them
    or who can’t stop crying
    & die of exposure
&  for those who are nothing without a job
    & no one to employ them except more trouble
    pushing them out on a limb
    & over the edge
    crushing the life out of anyone
    beneath them when they fall
&  for those fighting terrorizing voices in their heads
    reviling betraying & possessing them
&  for those who can't help driving everyone else
    away from them
&  for petty sneak thieves stealing pieces of themselves
&  for killers of plum trees & the moon
&  for the abandoned & damned adolescents
    unleashing vandalism & fists of vengeance
&  for those whose children are stolen
    by social cops
    & are driven mad by the anguish
    of unnatural loss
&  for those peddling every remnant of innocence
    & pawning every friend belonging to them
    for another fix or a bottle
    creating a purpose
    out of a daily nothingness
&  for those who've grown old
    & left behind a breach at a time
    but whose battered dignity
    is a victory of their own
&  for those whose religion
    is a lottery-bingo-!ongshot addiction
    revers1ng their history & bringing salvation
    but whose numbers never get picked or called
    & whose horses never come through
&  for those struggling to make
    against all odds
    an authentic personal change
&  for those who can't stand to be alone
    & can't stand to be known by anyone
&  for those picking fights
    out of a disabled desire
    for human communion
    & end-up with their lives
    & others' in ruins
&  for those boasting of being on top
    of what is obviously pinning them
    to illusions of mutilated lightning
&  for those dreaming plan after plan of escape
    but haven’t the means
    to get through yesterday
&  for those whose grip on a can of lysol
    is at least a perilous future
    of savage relief
&  for those called parasites or pariahs or bums
    but who gave their last shirt
    or pass a kind word
&  for those whose love is crippled & twisted
    yet bursting to give
    but can find no one able
    to heal & receive it
&  for those picking butts & fighting withdrawal
    with emergencies to get through
    on nothing but stoplights & starlight
    & 'to hell with it all'
&  for those who sentence themselves to die
    obsessed with bridges & razor blades
    & calculations of barbiturates & alcohol
&  for those wandering day and night
    searching curbs & glances
    for wallets & miracles
&  for those fed-up & disgusted
    enough to live
    out of shopping carts
    beneath viaducts
    or hidden in trees in the parks
&  for those who've never known a moment's peace
    & are so dirty & ugly & mean
    it's worth time in the bucket
    to shatter self-satisfied expressions
    of tourists strolling by
    looking clean
&  for those gripped by wheelchairs
    wobbling on canes
    lurching between crutches
    of unremitting pain
    & whose courage mocks a world
    speeding by in disdain
&  for those deliberately sabotaging
    every attempt at helping themselves
    adjust to a mass social madness
    accurately perceived
    as more insane than themselves
&  for those trying to get by
    & take care of a family
    on little more than defiance & love
    in overwhelmed & worried eyes
&  for those collapsing in shadows
    pissing their lives
    down the front of their pants
&  for those whose tattoos & time dots
    are the only possessions
    that haven’t been lost
    or stolen from them
&  for those talking only to birds & stones
    & sweeping evil spirits from the air
    with magical movements of their hands
&  for those longtime lovers & partners
    despite poverty's pressures
    clinging together
    amidst years of shit
    raining down on them
    a bad human weather
&  for those the most frightening
    fearing no one & nothing
    after having fear kicked out of them
    as soon as they could feel anything

for all these
my own
my selves
my tortured prey
& degraded predators
my brutally condemned
sisters & brothers
let my words
sing a prayer
not a curse
to the
terrIble
tragic
& sacred mystery
of our
beautiful
suffering
infinite worth

                 bud osborn



 


[top]

DTES Food Talks!

DTES Food Talks!
Presented by:
DTES Neighbourhood House
+ Potluck DTES Kitchen Tables Project  
Friday, November 14th, 2014 1-3pm @
DTES Neighbourhood House

573 E. Hastings St.

Is it difficult to get enough food to eat in a day?
Is food available as often as you’d like?
Are you satisfied with the quality and quantity of food you get?
What does the word “meal” mean to you?
How do you decide where to eat?

Come share your feedback on these questions and more in fun and engaging ways! Snacks provided.


[top]

Children of the Sand

Children of the Sand

Eggs fall from Mother’s hands
Two strong hands
Fine hair,
Creature made from grains of sand
A star called Earth
Time runs through her veins
Children at her door
Men came for more
Slowly she fades
As the grains of sand
pass through the hourglass
Child of dust
Life’s such a rush!

                Todd W Amos

[top]

Vancouver

Vancouver

frontier town
built on booze and fines
prostitutes paid
for the incorporation
available affordable
slam bang thank you ma’am
a bona fide municipality

Vancouver Canada the Wild West
“Chop the leg!”
no marshal   no medical
one skunk town then
one skunk town now

but Green, Green baby
rain forest green
green moss under the tall
cone-bearing trees
mould and mushrooms
here at the 49th parallel
6 or 7 months of rain some years
and Dark some months Dark
3 or 4 hours of sunlight
hot and dry for 3 months
the rivers of Capilano down to
the bare bleached rocks
A great summer for some

Weather gods pissed off talkin’ to
        Climate gods
coyote’s tail getting bushier
sockeye havin’ hard times returning
        to spawn & die

so the cycle continues albeit out
        of sync
with what is deemed “normal”
we are facing a challenge children
between supernatural & supernormal
real as opposed to surreal
to be or not to be
it starts that way
   and ends with a whimper

                                               Wilhelmina

[top]

Minister Responsible for Housing

Hon. Rich Coleman, Minister Responsible for Housing
Minister Coleman:

I write you today because I have learned that BC Housing will soon be making some major changes to the way that the Stamps Place housing development is owned and managed. I also understand that BC Housing sent out a media advisory on Friday to say that a “non-profit asset transfer” process would be initiated for Stamps Place in the near future.
I received phone calls and correspondence yesterday morning from a number of different people advising that they had heard that BC Housing will be finding a non-profit organization to take over the Stamps Place housing development. I was also informed that tenants received a letter on Friday saying that the property will no longer be operated by BC Housing in the near future, and that there will be new management within about six months’ time.
Already I have questions coming into my office regarding the pending changes. In particular, individuals are concerned about the operating agreements with the potential non-profit and their subsidy rates for both the short and long term. I would like to confirm that this plan will not displace current tenants, nor see their rent rates increase. Could you please confirm that there will be no changes to both the amount and the number of subsidies made available to the tenants at the Stamps Place development for both the short and long term? As a bench mark, can you advise how many people are receiving subsidies at this time and their rate of subsidy? Beyond the impact for the existing tenants, could you please also confirm that this plan will not change the rate and ratio of subsidies provided to this development in the long term?
With the transfer of ownership and management of the Stamps Place development, could you advise if BC Housing will put in place conditions or covenants with the new operator to ensure that the site remains in perpetuity as non-profit housing?
With regard to staffing, I understand that the people currently employed at Stamps Place will not be affected or lose their jobs as a result of this process. Can you advise if there will be a successorship agreement with the prospective new operator? Could you advise the number of full-time staff or Full-Time Equivalent staff currently are employed at the Stamps Place site and their job titles? Jenny Kwan, MLA Constituency Office: (Vancouver-Mount Pleasant) #1070-1641 Commercial Drive Parliament Buildings Vancouver, BC V5L 3Y3 Victoria, BC V8V 1X4 Ph: (604) 775-0790 Ph: (250) 387-3655 Fax: (604) 775-0881 Fax: (250) 387-4680
 
  Over the last few years, I have seen some renovation work done at the buildings. I would also like to have a clear understanding of all major renovations and building upgrade or maintenance projects that have been completed at Stamps Place in the past five years. Could you please provide me with a list of the major upgrades that were completed at the Stamps Place development? As well, are there any outstanding renovations or upgrades that remain to be undertaken?
  With this major change in direction for BC Housing, I would also like to know of BC's Housing plans for the MacLean Park housing development. Is it BC Housing's intention to retain and continue to operate MacLean Park under BC Housing, or will MacLean Park undergo a similar process to the Stamps Place development? Or alternatively, are there any plans to redevelop MacLean Park?
  Your assistance in providing this information, and other updates as the asset transfer is undertaken, will be greatly appreciated. Already I have heard questions from constituents which suggest that incorrect information about the sale of the property may be circulating, so it would be most helpful if I am kept informed as this process unfolds.
  Thank you, and I will look forward to your reply.

Sincerely,
Jenny Kwan
MLA, Vancouver-Mount Pleasant
Cc: Shayne Ramsay, CEO, BC Housing, MLA David Eby.

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Is There A New Threat in Iraq?
             Is There A New Threat in Iraq?
      ISIS. It stands for the Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham, or Syria.
       Now it's supposedly the new problem in the world, that is if you're watching the latest t.v. newscasts or reading the daily newspaper.
     "This is barbaric," one powerful person after another said when ISIS fanatics showed the cut-off heads of three westerners to the world.
     These acts were barbaric. Yet the western powers, especially the United States and Great Britain have done some barbaric things too in Iraq.
    Let's go back nearly 100 years. The western powers back then, namely the U.S. of A., Britain, Canada, Italy and France had won the  First World War after four years of terrible fighting from 1914 to 1918. At the peace conference in France at Versailles in 1919, the British and the French carved up the Turkish Empire. Turkey fought alongside the other losers like Germany and Austria-Hungary. The winners around the Versailles conference table created new countries in the Middle East that were now under their control.
      One of the new or rejigged countries was Iraq. The British put three peoples, Sunni Moslims, Shia Muslims and the Kurds, who were also Moslems, into a country that was now called 'Iraq'. Yet there was a problem. Shias and Sunnis didn't like each other and hadn't since the 8th century, 1100 years before. And neither of these two groups liked the Kurds.
     But the British government didn't care. Iraq had lots of oil and it's new king liked the British. Now some Kurdish people didn't like this new set-up at all. They rose in revolt against the British and were joined by Afghani tribes people in Afghanistan who also wanted a new set-up in their country too.
     "I am strongly in favour of using poisoned gas against uncivilized tribes," said the British politician Winston Churchill at the time. The British government, said Churchill, "must procure a speedy termination of the disorder that prevails on the frontier."
        So poison gas, that had killed thousands of people in World War One, was used against the Kurds and the Afghanis. Iraq was now a loyal supporter of the British Empire. Yet this couldn't last forever. In 1958 a progressive military leader named Kassem overthrew the Iraqi king. In 1963 he in turn was overthrown and murdered, possibly with help from the Central Intelligence Agency.
     Iraq then went through a time of turmoil. When all this ended in 1979, Saddam Hussein emerged as Iraq's powerful leader.By now Iraqi governments had nationalized the country's oil. Benefits flowed to the people. Schools, hospitals, libraries, roads and other things were built with money from oil revenues.
     At the top of the heap, Hussein ruled with an iron hand. He was a Sunni Moslem from Tikrit who mistrusted the Shia majority and the Kurds. He used force and violence  to murder rivals and crush dissent. Yet the Iraqi people who stayed on the sidelines did benefit.
     "Baghdad was a lovely city," said a t.v. cameraman who visited Iraq in the early 1980's. "Lots of people seemed to be doing quite well under Hussein." Yet then came more upheaval and everything changed for the worst.
     (End of Part One).                         By dave jaffe

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DTES Small Arts Grants
    DTES Small Arts Grants
Applications will be available on:
Friday, October 24, 2014 after 1 PM.
  -please pick up at the Carnegie Centre main floor information desk.
   To learn more about the grants and their criteria, please attend one of our information sessions:
 
Tuesday, October 28th, 2:00 - 3:30 PM, Classroom 2 (3rd floor), Carnegie Centre, 401 Main Street.
 
Tuesday, November 4th, 6:00 - 7:30 PM, Classroom 2 (3rd floor), Carnegie Centre, 401 Main Street.
 
For more information:
Jason Bouchard, coordinator
Email: dtesartsgrants@gmail.com
Phone: 778-879-9843
Website: vancouverfoundationsmallarts.ca

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Fear and loathing in Olympic Village

Fear and loathing in Olympic Village
To the editor:  (Vancouver Courier)
Re: "Social housing project generates 729 police calls in first 16 months," S.!'pt.24.
VPD Chief Jim Chu, in this article, reinforces the belief prominently held by many, including many Vision Councillors that the hard to house "should not be just dumped in the Downtown Eastside …”
In this case, it appears as though in pursuit of a grand social experiment these residents have now been, in fact, dumped into an area they have no social engagement with, no community support to fall back on and all in a virtual dead zone where their only neighbours are warehouses, small businesses and 'strata-owners that despise and fear them.
How can we expect people who are barely coping with desperate frailties to cope in this kind of environment? Those who are so eager to see the Downtown Eastside flushed clear of these kinds of projects might ask themselves how many police calls would have come through had this same facility been built within that neighbourhood.
Sites there that offer housing to people with special needs never rack up trouble calls in volumes like this because the residents are supported daily by street contact, peer connectivity as well as professional therapeutic intervention where needed.
A great disservice has been done to these people by setting them up for failure in this pathetic sterile environment in the middle of nowhere.
It will be most interesting to compare the wellbeing of these tenants to those who will soon be moving into the new Princess Street premises next year where residents will be housed within an existing neighbourhood that is accustomed to behavioural shortcomings that many will have and will offer a better measure of support than is now instead only misery for just about everyone in and around the Marguerite Ford Apartments.

Ian MacRae, Vancouver

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This is a great day for democracy!
Dear Paul R. Taylor,

This is a great day for democracy!
I'm thrilled to tell you that today we officially filed a constitutional challenge to strike down sections of the "Fair" Elections Act.
  You'll remember the scandal surrounding the Harper Conservatives' re-writing of Canada's election laws earlier this year that triggered widespread outrage from every corner of the country.
  Thanks to your amazing support and generous donations, the Council of Canadians led an effective rapid-response campaign to stop the "Fair" Elections Act that reached over one million Canadians! And because of our collective efforts, the Harper Conservatives were forced to back down and make substantial changes.
  But the "Fair" Elections Act remains profoundly anti-democratic and still violates our Charter of Rights and Freedoms that guarantees "Every citizen of Canada has the right to vote".
  That's why we've joined with the Canadian Federation of Students and three individual electors to file our constitutional challenge of the act on the grounds that it will:
* Disenfranchise upwards of 100,000 eligible voters – mostly students, seniors and First Nations – by making it impossible for them to prove their address or identity in order to cast their ballot in the 2015 federal election.
* Strip the Chief Electoral Officer of her/his independence and power to both investigate fraud – like the robocall scandal – and communicate such activities to Parliament and the Canadian public.
* Expose the Commissioner of Canada Elections to partisan interference by making her/him accountable to the government, rather than to Parliament.
I'll be straight with you – this is going to be tough.
  It's critical that we present the strongest argument possible if we're to successfully strike down these anti-democratic sections of the act before the upcoming 2015 federal election.
  That's where you come in.
  Constitutional challenges aren't cheap. We urgently need to raise new funds to cover upcoming costs related to research, evidence gathering and expert testimony.
  We also have to be prepared if the Harper Conservatives apply to be interveners in our case. You'll remember federal court justice Richard Mosley accused the Conservatives of engaging in "trench warfare" to stop our robocalls legal challenge. So you know they'll be up to their old tricks again.
  Legal costs are expected to exceed $100,000. The good news is generous Council supporters have already chipped in to raise more than $25,000!

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October 15, 2014