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Nov 1, 2014

Contents

Heart of the City Festival SECOND WEEK

11th Annual Downtown Eastside Heart of the City Festival
SECOND WEEK
So much more to do! Most is free; check it out!
Saturday November 1 to Sunday November 9, 2014

WORKSHOPS – CARNEGIE - Free
Sat Nov 1 • Slam Poetry, with Pamela Bentley and Sho Wiley, 10am–12pm. 3rd floor Classroom
Sun Nov 2 • Community/Political Posters, with Murray Bush. 2pm–5pm. 3rd floor Gallery
Thurs Nov 6 • Scraps & Stitches, with Karenza T. Wall. 2:30pm-5:30pm. 3rd floor Gallery
        
SATURDAY November 1  

• 10am – 3pm. OPEN HOUSE. Vancouver Police Museum, 2nd floor 240 E. Cordova. Free
• 12pm – 4pm. OPEN HOUSE. St. James’ Anglican Church, 303 E. Cordova. Free

• KEEPERS OF THE FLAME: A Daylong Celebration of Poetry.
Carnegie Centre, 401 Main. Free
1pm Carnegie’s 2nd Poetry Slam! with MC Jillian Christmas
1:30pm Poetree on the street, with Magdelanye
3pm A Celebration of Bud Osborn, with Graham Ord, Paul Blaney, Kedrick James
and guests, MC Sharon Kravitz
7pm DTES Poets Open Mic, with special guest Antonette Rea, Host Diane Wood

• 6pm-10pm. SHRINES for DAY OF THE DEAD. Inside Carnegie Theatre & outside Carnegie. Free    

SUNDAY November 2

• AT THE INTERURBAN GALLERY. 1 E. Hastings. Free
12:30pm ACCORDIONS ON FIRE…AT HOME!, with the Squeezebox Circle
2:30pm HEIDI MORGAN and FRIENDS
3:20pm HAISLA with NASTY, BRUTISH & SHORT
4:30pm BUD OSBORN and POEMS FROM THE NEIGHBOURHOOD, Thursdays Writing Collective
    
• 2pm. SAWAGI TAIKO & TZO’KAM. SFU Woodward’s, 149 W. Hastings. Free

3pm THEY WOULDN’T TAKE NO FOR AN ANSWER Panel. Russian Hall. 800 Campbell. Free
    
WEDNESDAY November 5  
                  
• 1pm. GREAT VANCOUVER FIRE Slide Show. Carnegie Learning Centre, 3rd floor. Free
                  
• 7:30pm DTES FRONT AND CENTRE: O Muses, light my fire!, Carnegie Theatre. Free
                  
• 8pm THE RAYMUR MOTHERS: Two for One. Tickets: 604-708-5448 or www.theatreintheraw.ca
    
THURSDAY November 6
 
                  
• 5pm. GATHER ROUND FOR A STORY: Our Journey of Reconciliation So Far. UBC Learning Exchange, 612 Main. Free
                  
• 7pm SALT WATER CITY STORIES, with Sean Gunn, Karin Lee, Jim Wong-Chu, Faye Leung, MC Sid Chow Tan. Chapel Arts, 304 Dunlevy. Free
     
FRIDAY November 7
 
                  
• 2pm. WHO STOLE THE SPIRIT OF CARNEGIE. Carnegie Theatre. Free
                  
• 6pm FEAST YOUR EYES TOO! A Fashion Show Celebration. DTES Women’s Centre, 302 Columbia. Women and men welcome! Free
                  
• 7pm. The MOZART MIRACLE, with City Opera. Carnegie Theatre. Free
                  
• 7pm. ROARING COMEDY, with Merlin, David Granirer & Stand Up For Mental Health. Gallery Gachet, 88 E. Cordova. Free
                  
• 7pm-10pm. EASTSIDE FRIDAY: Creative Magic!. EWMA Studio, 56 E. Hastings. Free
    
SATURDAY November 8  
                  
• 11am. DTES RENOVICTIONS WALKING TOUR, with CCAP. Meet on front steps of Carnegie. Free for local residents
                  
• 12pm FIELDHOUSE STUDIO HOP. Starts at MacLean Park Fieldhouse, 710 Keefer. Free
                  
• 2pm BIG PRINT Artist Talk. Raven’s Eye Studios, 456 E. Hastings. Free
                  
• 2pm CELEBRATING BLACK STRATHCONA. Carnegie Theatre. Free
                  
• 4pm A RIGHT TO REMAIN COMMUNITY PRESENTATION. Gallery Gachet, 88 E. Cordova. Free
                  
• 6pm RECONCILIATION – MOVING FORWARD TOGETHER. Talkumentary - films, performance, guest speakers. Carnegie Theatre. Free
                  
• 6:30pm CARNEGIE SING ALONG CHOIR, led by Mike Richter. Carnegie 3rd floor Gallery. Free
        
SUNDAY November 9
 
                  
• 1pm URBAN CLOTH PROJECT: Terroir. Hastings Urban Farm, 58 W. Hastings. Free
    
For further details pick up the Festival Program Guide at the Carnegie Front Desk, around the neighbourhood or visit www.heartofthecityfestival.com. For information please call 604-628-5672.

Presented by Vancouver Moving Theatre with the Carnegie Community Centre & the Association of United Ukrainian Canadians, working with over 40 community partners.

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night gift

             night gift
"Water is to land what the voice is to the body"
- Kaluli knowledge, via Steven Feld and Walter Lew

make space and let the night speak through you - what will the darkness say? will it sigh the song of night cleaners, the lament of the wrongly imprisoned,
the rage of the ragged, the dispossessed? how will the night take you back?
will you be the vessel for earth shatter, hydro poison, ancestral revenge? perhaps steady weeds, growing irrepressibly into the cracks, urban repurposing, straddling both the drugs that kill and the ones that heal?'
the globe moves around the sun, unstoppable, feeding pine trees
and the petro-state alike, giving us the days and nights by which to stand with the trees, what the industry calls overburden, or to die more rapidly,
more stupidly, by peak oil.
as rivers and oceans fill with carcinogenic wastes from the petroleum-plastic-supply-chain,
the political systems follow, stuffed full of suncorpse and tired old neo-colonial ego
that refuses to stop growing until it reaches the limits of the planet's patience .
who knows what alliances and monkeywrenches will be enough to stop the greed
of the greasy machine?     .
what I do know is that humble migrants who've traveled the ocean know its wisdom better     than an arrogant elite that doesn't heed the world's necessary stories.
jail the stories and the storytellers, but they will keep speaking the night
until empire expires, with or without the multitudes alive.
in this race may we be ready to move fast, yet steady enough to encompass musicians  and lake gatherings, forests and guerrilla gardens, fueled by a love
more immense than the unnatural systems we've inherited!
we need to live the world that is possible even while we struggle through war. respect living coasts and fluid watersheds, not murderous imperial borders.
in grief and in celebration, in fear and in courage, in anger and in compassion, the night replenishes us so that we may continue to embody her songs.
                                                                    Rita Wong

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ENVIRONMENTAL RIGHTS BILL
ENVIRONMENTAL RIGHTS BILL
OTTAWA - NDP leader Thomas Mulcair is proud to second groundbreaking legislation introduced by Linda Duncan (Edmonton-Strathcona), an Environmental Bill of Rights to legally enshrine environmental rights for Canadians and the duty of the federal government to take action to protect the environment.
  "As Minister of Environment in Quebec, I made the right to a healthy environment a charter right for all residents of Quebec," said Thomas Mulcair, Leader of the Official Opposition. "I am pleased to support this bill, which would safeguard the right of present and future generations of all Canadians to a healthy and ecologically balanced environment".
According to Duncan, "This bill is long overdue. The Supreme Court ruled that the federal government shares responsibility for protection of the environment. My bill grants Canadians the specific right to have a voice in all decisions impacting their environment, to take the federal government to court where those rights are denied or where federal laws are not enforced and it protects whistle-blowers". The bill also amends the Bill of Rights to add an environmental right.
"Canadians must be given a voice. An NDP government will work with the provinces, territories and all Canadians to make the right to a clean, healthy environment a guaranteed and absolute right," said Mr. Mulcair.

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Walk a mile in my Gucci’s

Walk a mile in my Gucci’s

$600 could have bought .••
• A wheelchair for my dear wife so I could push her when she's in too much pain to walk (a retiree)
·Milk for my kids for a year (mother of four)
• Almost 300 bus tickets for my job search rides
(young immigrants)
·600 bowls 0' soup at Carnegie (hungry young man) ·Enough noodles to last for 5 years (Chinese G-mthr)
*Tune-up for old beater that gets us to work each day (Mr + Mrs working poor)
*Laser surgery for cataracts in both eyes (senior) *Steel-toed boots and a hard hat so I could get a construction job (young man) *150 jars of jam to go with my peanut butter sandwiches (school girl)
*1 could get my prescriptions filled (senior citizen) ·600 presents from the Dollar Store so I'd always have gifts for my family (a 'training' wage earner)
*Bannock to feed all the hungry tummies and blankets for the winter (an elder)
*Decent clothes for my children to wear to school so no one laughs at them (single mom)
*Dinner for 300 people at Union Gospel Mission at Easter (homeless person)
*Brushes and paint (a starving artist)
*600 boxes of Kraft Dinner (a young mom)
*Comfortable shoes for the next 10 years for our
poor, tired feet (taxpaying public)
    Instead our $600 became some ugly shoes
abandoned in a rich woman's closet.
                                                               M. Kelly

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Tree

                Tree

Never leave the home place
thinking you’ll make it back
strolling with my dotta
showing Carlos’ sweat T shop
makin’ promises I can’t  promises
I can only hope to keep
might be the last go-round
Cowboy Bob drops a line
everytime leads to a new time,
    new place
you know, all that I stuff I stick to
usually works out though
the way an arbutus tree
only row a short distance
from the Pacific, straight & true
gnobly or not you’ll always see
know one when ya
see one
                                     Al

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In Memory of Kelly Stewart

In Memory of Kelly Stewart

There is a story that's now being told,
Her heart was sort of made of gold.
I often pondered 'How could this be?'
She was kind of like a stranger to me.
Those who had known her sadly said,
She was quite intelligent and well read.
Her guiding light was within her heart,
Charitable causes had played their part.
There are so many things one can think,
And reasons with just an eye of a blink.
I wish I had plenty more words to say,
Of a precious lady who went her way.
If only I had more words to tell,
I just wish I knew her very well.
Because now she's gone so far away,
I feel like I'd seen her only yesterday.
I never really knew her all that well,
There's not very much for me to tell.
She often sat in that rotating chair,
Her volunteering was fair and square.
Seventy years old is still very young,
So 'Amazing Grace' is what I sung.
Although she didn't live for very long,
I still sang for her this peaceful song.
Being a single mom was meant to be,
With a loving son that set her free.
And I wish I knew her as a friend,
Tragedies are often hard to mend.

                                        © DJ Bruce             

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RE: Raising Social Assistance Rates

Premier Christy Clark & Hon. Don McRae, Ministry of Social Development and Social Innovation
Box 9041, Station PROV GOVT
Victoria, BC  V8W 9E1
Dear Premier Clark and Minister McRae,
     RE: Raising Social Assistance Rates
  I am writing on behalf of many constituents who receive social assistance, and are in dire financial straits every day. Specifically, I respectfully request that you raise welfare rates.
  The typical rate of $610/month is grossly inadequate to meet basic needs. This amount means that there is only $26/week remaining to cover not only food but also clothing, medication, transport, childcare, education, hygiene, and other fundamental necessities - a task that cannot be realistically achieved. The current welfare rates are abysmal and ensure that people will remain destitute.
  It is difficult to put into words the sense of anger and despair shared by those stuck in the poverty trap. This is a wealthy province, so why does our province have the highest poverty rate in all of Canada? This is often passed off as due to individual failings, but I have seen an abundance of motivation & capacity amongst those living below the poverty line. The problem is due to a failure of public policy.
  I know that it is our collective hope that our poorest citizens have a better life, and a better future. But first they need stability. And stability is only achieved with a decent income. The rates need to be raised immediately – and I ask that your government do so. Thank you for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Libby Davies, MP (Vancouver East)

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Strangers – Estimated Time of Arrival

Strangers – Estimated Time of Arrival

Very early one morning many moons ago
On my way to the café Robon-Strasse
Taking my usual shortcut through the
Art Gallery block beside the fountain
I was surprised
Watching the strangers in black
    unload their gear
Big black vans, electric equipment
tic tock, I think.
“A film location?”
They answered me not
Going about their work in a seriojus
    and practiced manner.
I felt something momentous, perhaps
    secret
Should I even be witnessing this
    grim crew?
I felt invisible to them, or maybe
    just irrelevant
I moved on by to the warmth of
hot coffee and cinnamon buns
I forgot my encounter at the Gallery
Did thee not come to me & the world
    that day immortal bird?
Myself amid alien corn.
L’etranger, nobody’s child of this
    forgotten slur
No womb of earth gave me life
But the eternal ocean.
And you  familiar to me as myself.

                    Wilhelmina Mary X

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Assassination' of Public Health Systems Driving Ebola Crisis

Assassination' of Public Health Systems Driving Ebola Crisis, Experts Warn           Neoliberal economic policies that defund health infrastructure responsible for current crisis in West Africa and across the globe, say analysts.         By  Sarah Lazare, staff writer

   As the official West African death toll from the worst Ebola outbreak in recorded history nears 5,000, global concerns about the highly infectious disease continue to mount. Analysts and medical providers, from Liberia to the United States, say that in order to address the crisis, the international community must tackle the real culprit: western-driven economic policies defunding public health systems around the world, particularly in the countries hit hardest by the outbreak.
   "The neoliberal economic model assassinated public infrastructure," said Emira Woods, a Liberia native and social impact director at ThoughtWorks, a technology firm committed to social and economic justice, in an interview with Common Dreams. "A crisis of the proportion we've seen since the beginning of the Ebola catastrophe shows this model has failed."
Gutting of West African Public Health Systems
 Since the 1980s, western financial institutions have given loans to third world governments on the condition those states impose austere domestic reforms and roll back public services. This approach is encapsulated in the 1981 World Bank report Accelerated Development in Sub-Saharan Africa, which presses for "structural adjustments," including rapid privatization, shrinking of public services and subsidies, and a shift towards export dependency as a solution to "slow economic growth."
   "In West Africa, the resulting neoliberal economic policies sought to promote growth and prosperity through structural adjustment programs (SAPs) that generally involved contraction of government services, renewed export orientation on crops or goods deemed to have a comparative advantage, privatization of parastatal organizations, removal or reduction of many subsidies and tariffs, and currency devaluations," explain Macalester College Professor William Moseley and colleagues in a paper for the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.
   "What you had was a shift of public expenditures from health care, school, and essential services to a model of economic development driven by the World bank and International Monetary Fund, which said that public service provision was not passage to development, and services should be privatized," said Woods. "There was this notion that poor people can pay, and services are better provided by the private sector."
   While years of war played a role in weakening public systems, it is the "war against people, driven by international financial institutions" that is largely responsible for decimating the public health care system, eroding wages and conditions for health care workers, and fueling the crisis sweeping West Africa today, says Woods. "Over the past six months to a year there have been rolling health care worker strikes in country after country—Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and Liberia," said Woods. "Nurses and doctors are risking and losing their lives but don't have protective gear needed to serve patients and save their own lives. They are on the front lines and have not had their voices heard."
Even the World Health Organization, which is tasked by the United Nations with directing international responses to epidemics, acknowledges the detrimental impact these policies have had on public health systems. "In health, SAPs affect both the supply of health services (by insisting on cuts in health spending) and the demand for health services (by reducing household income, thus leaving people with less money for health)," states the organization. "Studies have shown that SAPs policies have slowed down improvements in, or worsened, the health status of people in countries implementing them. The results reported include worse nutritional status of children, increased incidence of infectious diseases, and higher infant and maternal mortality rates."
A "Highly Vulnerable" World
  Medical responders have criticized the international community for failing to aggressively address the crisis. In a press statement issued in late August, Brice de le Vingne, Doctors Without Borders director of operations, slammed western states for their isolationist policies towards the epidemic: "Self-protection is occupying the entire focus of states that have the expertise and resources to make a dramatic difference in the affected countries. They can do more, so why don’t they?"
   The WHO has recently suffered severe budget cuts that have left it weakened, under-staffed, and incapable of adequately responding to the international emergency. "There’s no doubt we’ve not been as quick and as powerful as we might have been," Dr. Marie-Paule Kieny, a WHO assistant director general, told the New York Times in an article examining the cuts.
  Critics say the de-funding of public health system within western states is putting populations at risk. Despite the efforts of the Centers for Disease Control and the Obama administration to assure the U.S. public of a robust response, nurses tell a different story. Workers with the union National Nurses United have repeatedly warned that the for-profit U.S. health care system is in fact ill-prepared for an Ebola outbreak, with U.S. hospitals lacking basic protocols, training, and protective gear.
  Meanwhile, Woods warns, the U.S.'s militarized response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa—including Obama's authorization on Thursday for the Pentagon to deploy reserve and National Guard troops—raises serious concerns. "If you think about the costs of sending in the military compared to putting resources into nurses and doctors and rebuilding public health infrastructure that will last, U.S. tax payers should be really questioning the tax dollars being spent and what the long-term implications are."
 "The world will remain highly vulnerable to this and similar outbreaks unless all countries prioritize the universal right to health, including the international obligation of rich countries to pay their fair share in ensuring that basic health capacity is available everywhere," the global justice organization U.S. Africa Network argues. "The failure to do so is a violation of human rights and our common humanity "  .                                       

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License

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Poverty in the Promised Land

Poverty in the Promised Land

In the Fifties we scrounged the dump
    for heavy glass
-Pop bottles- coca cola, orange crush, 7UP
Patsy Murphy & I traded them for
    penny candy:
Black Babies, Honeymoons, Coconut, Buds,
     -tiny cones full of honey+ brown sugar                              -delicious to us.
    Also the blackberries by the train track
Near the dump, the abattoir & Africaville;
but the biggest, juiciest grew near the
    Graveyard ...
We sold them for 50c a quart (remember quarts)
Now I cruise the lanes for good garbage
        cans + bottles for recycling
to buy bread & milk, maybe a little
    meat
Oh Canada, our home + the Native's land
Glorious and free!
Freedom is a thin gruel
Human rights cold comfort in the mean
    streets.
                             Wilhelmina

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Function as Art Art as Function

Function as Art Art as Function

The artwork of Sue Griese
This show is an experiment on different ways to involve the public and galleries in ways to view functional pottery as an art form. This show will coexist in
two gallery spaces:
Studio126, 126 East Pender St
November 7 - January 4   Opening Saturday, Nov 8
GalleryGachet, 88 East Cordova St.
2-5pm, November 14 - December 21
Opening Friday, November 14, 7-10pm

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From the Library

From the Library

With the “Heart of the City Festival” in full effect, I would like to highlight some of the artists’ work found in the library.  To compliment the “Celebration of Bud Osborn” event (Nov 1 @ 3pm), we’ve got access to several of Bud Osborn’s writings such as Keys to Kingdoms, Oppenheimer Park, and Signs of the Times.
The First Nations musical group, Tzokam will be performing on Nov. 2nd, and the library shares their CD called, Heart beats: a CD benefit for Warriors Against Violence (Music CD - 784.51 H43w).  Tzokam includes traditional singer/composer Russell Wallace, whose CD Neo-nativisms is available (Music CD – 784.751 W19n).  The event also features the all-women Japanese drum group Sawagi Taiko, who can be heard on this Tiqilap Singers CD, Where the People Gather (Music CD – 784.751 T59w).
Renae Morriseau (Juno award winner) is part of the powerful line-up of women for the event “Women in the Round” on Nov. 1, and can be heard sharing her story on this DVD called, Echoes of the Sisters regarding First Nations women and breast cancer (DVD – 616.99449 E18c1).

If you enjoyed David Granirer’s comedy routine at “Stand-up for Mental Health” (Nov. 7) consider reading his book The Happy Neurotic: How fear and angst can lead to happiness and success (158.1 G759h) or watching the film on using laughter as therapy called Cracking Up (DVD – 362.2 C88g).
On Nov. 8th, an event called “Celebrating Black Strathcona” includes performances by Vanessa Richards and Kevan Cameron.  Cameron contributed to the book The Great Black North: Contemporary African Canadian poetry, which can be requested from the Central library (c821.8 G7862m).
And, if you plan on joining “The Jade Peony Walking Tour” (Nov. 9), make sure you read a copy of Wayson Choy’s novel before you go!
  The library wishes everyone a wonderful “Heart of
the City Festival” experience!
                                         Your librarian, Natalie

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ERODED COUNSEL
ERODED COUNSEL
Shiny stones upon sunrise beach
contain some kind of unique soul each
And could they separately speak
Out to our static human kind
One by special tectonic one
what would they then say?
Would they tell us “Slow down, think”
Spend less time polluting our earth
Would they flinty scream and scream
At us to watch less computer/tv screen?
And stroll much more on them
Or would they soft whisper that
in due geological time,we shall all of us
become them!
                           John Alan Douglas

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THE SCATTERED MEN

THE SCATTERED MEN
The Social Unrest Party is gunning for the Liberals this is no big surprise news story been played out before, moral shellings & half-truth tellings shall make us choose who not to believe more, like an other boy sent to the corner of a room social service surplus are here & not a moment too soon (very de-pressing) for the next generation & beyond, back when they were smoothing out the first opium war China was leasing Hong Kong for 99 years no more dates come & vanish so many have gone, it is with heavy hearts as homeless decomposes into hopeless the young the old alike are scattered like drops from a heavy torrent of wind & rain, like winning a Nobel Prize for Forensic Artist of the Year or discovering a kind way of instilling fear as discreet panic & wide-spread apathy are too scattered one more time again, I hear the Passerines (love birds) with the marching of these men from subtropical to sub-arctic climates made for unlikely chances made possible...
The big question is when the capable are not culpable if only calm could take over a city about to vote...
    The XTC song Mayor of Simpleton sure fits the fiscal & financial bill, soon it will be a crime to have your ashes scattered wherever on this earth that means the most to you – drone caskets & drone urns will come in designer or generic plus all the pretty colours too & all the collectors can put them by their money: coins plus all the one & two-dollar bills,
  As your heart slowly beats itself to death a natural causes expirer who's lived to 80 or so that's one billion beats (who's counting...besides me) we all have our secrets far beneath our breath soon drone gift shops will be selling fresh just caught breath along with the new issue of the Primitive Times newspaper, like if this planet were to commit mankindicide could you really blame it We have turned into a toilet full of overflowing garbage & throwaway newborns tossed like rubbish   this neighbourhood used to be so nice soon to be just another crater, They say it is better to have belonged & lost than to have never belonged at all but the scattering has will&alwayswill begun ----
Now if we're not already in hell the departing gifts throw me off as the scattering of sanity really turns me upside down as I cough I wonder if this last war wins' mentality will extinguish all our shining suns.
                                   By ROBERT McGILLIVRAY

   “Distrust all in whom the impulse to punish is powerful.”   -Friedrich Nietzsche

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November 1, 2014