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Dec 15, 2014

Contents

Remove the Selfish Yuppies from the City of Vancouver

Remove the Selfish Yuppies from the City of Vancouver

  Petitioning Mayor Gregor Robertson and Vision Vancouver
When yuppies started moving into Vancouver, it was expected that they would be good, caring neighbours and compassionate citizens of this city. Instead, they are selfishly stalling all attempts at shelter and housing for all in their growing sense of entitlement to the land that Vancouver occupies, even though it is unceded and really belongs to the Coast Salish peoples.
  Their greed, combined with their lack of empathy, has made Vancouver into a hostile place in which people living in multimillion dollar condominiums' only attempts at social change are to rally to shut down the few, underfunded cold weather homeless shelters in the city and force the most marginalized people onto the streets.
  Now that there are so many yuppies in the city, it is becoming unsafe to be poor here. At every turn, yuppies threaten our housing stability, ruthlessly taking over every neighbourhood they can under the premise of improvement or cleaning things up. There has been a documented spike in renovictions and homelessness as housing prices and therefore the yuppie population grows and thrives.
  While we welcome a wide variety of income levels in our city, we feel that these people need to be rehabilitated, to remember how to have compassion and empathy for their fellow humankind before they are allowed to live alongside us in this city.
  We need to get this dysfunctional, self-interested "community" out of our city before they destroy the whole thing. We need to make Vancouver a yuppie-free zone to have a real city made of real communities in which people have empathy and compassion for one another, and where people know, love, and care for their neighbours.
  Mayor Robertson and Vision Vancouver, please rethink your strategy of catering to developers and yuppies. We need real community and that starts with housing for all.

                                            Megan Speers

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Structure of a Billion Nails

Structure of a Billion Nails

Laying under a X-mas tree meant to die  If I climb to the roof & see if I can fly why should gravity be able to take me down, another black teen shot to death by cops while here 6 cops need to kill a mentally distraught time & its elements cement me to the ground, like being visibly shaken but not stirred imbeciles like Miley Cyrus & Justin Beiber have made jokes of themselves they just do not understand how to use words like sorry or excuse me while I lick the envelope for my donation to their lobotomys, another year has run us down guzzle that booze we don’t want the government to frown screw that I want to see Emperor Gregor & figurehead Harper on their knees grey skies & gray cups are happening as I speak by a cemetery I should be in I may be morbid but that is not a sin the Holiday Enforcement Chapter of the Hell’s Angels has arrived, like a Nazi-themed nativity set up outside your house the pristine ruins of an American way of life have been stuffed like a big dead mouse your disgruntled postal worker may have different views on just who gets to live, structures built out of a billion nails have destroyed the frailty on Further Street turned people against each other now that’s no way to treat the poor ‘the dispirited’ the lonely of soul, heart & mind, fingerpointing is an art form so abstract & full of the energy we used to know so many Decemberitized & paralysed by the end of yet another year set on dying new ones are too easy to find, Death has hammered our families too many times yet I must live & must be on time I swear as the SatanGodIceCream family as my witness for the prosecution I would give my years away if the price & circumstances were right
  we are the ones who have injured the frailty on Further Street We are the ones who somehow never make ends meet, as soon as a bit of blackness emerges from the sky we are out of sight, like a sightseeing eye dog we all get cut down to size your ignorance is greatly appreciated
As the salt water runs down my face & eyes Further Street is where we watch all dreams disappear only to live inside your head, try to have a better ending than in the past of course the night&daymares leaving me alone would be so cool but I was born to play the ultimate everyday run of the mill fool (some think I could een pass for dead) cheers to one cheers to all let us be civilised and share the upcoming maximum velocity fall New Vancouver is built on our rights to live & breathe & bleed (your fave’) the raqin washes blood off of our streets; if you have a little living left over a new year is roaring to a station near you…
as for me I play music write a billion letters by pen & paper it’s the only way to keep my evaporating insanity from becoming unglued as the frailty on Further Street turns up that depressional & confessional beat.

                    By ROBERT McGILLIVRAY
P.S. Another year another dollar,
       Progress no protest Yes & most definitively
           no global leeches!
Q.”Awaken you dreamers, adrift in your beds,
Balloons & streamers decorate the inside of your heads”
                                         -Andy Partridge

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Poor People’s Radio Show

Poor People’s Radio Show
15 and 1500 in ‘15

  On Friday, December 5, Raise the Rates with Western Aboriginal Harm Reduction Society (WAHRS), Carnegie Community Action Program (CCAP), Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU), Aboriginal Front Door and Downtown Eastside residents organized a march & rally of over 70 people for the 3rd annual Poor People’s Radio Show outside the CBC.
  After 32 years of Food Banks in BC & 28 years of the CBC raising money for the Food Banks, we want to know when is society going to end the need for Food Banks. Food Banks alleviate symptoms, hunger, for a few days, but do not tackle the cause – poverty.  They were established as a “temporary” measure; but are now an institution – a tragic, permanent acceptance of mass poverty in the rich province of BC.
  Einstein said “Insanity: doing the same thing over & over again and expecting different results.” After 32 years of Food Banks, with increasing hunger, it is time to change. Food Banks Canada states that, “without poverty, food banks would not need to exist.”
  The poverty line in BC is around $1,500 a month so, as no one should live in poverty, Raise the Rates proposes that the welfare rate should be $1,500 a month (with a Person with Disabilities rate of $1,800 a month). This, linked with minimum wage of $15 an hour, would end poverty. We say fifteen hundred and fifteen in ’15.
  The Poor People’s Radio hour-long show included moving speeches, uplifting songs from Solidarity Notes Choir and drumming. Victoria Bull opened the show with an acknowledgment of standing on unceded Coast Salish territory. The co-hosts, Tracey Morrison and Wendy Pederson, guided the show. Audrey Seagal, a Musqueam activist, spoke about her own experiences of poverty and the links to wider social injustice. Harold Lavender, Richard Cunningham and Kombii Nanjalah all spoke of their experiences of poverty. They pointed out that the present welfare system neither works to support people, who through misfortune, are on welfare nor benefits wider society.
  Fraser Stewart proposed that, after 28 years of the CBC raising money for Food Banks, the CBC should have a serious discussion on Food Bank Day of the actions needed to end the need for Food Banks.  It would be a great achievement if 2015 was the last Food Bank Day as BC was ending poverty.
  Bill Hopwood, from Raise the Rates, stated that as BC is a rich province there is no reason for poverty – poverty is the result of political decisions about the priorities. As BC is the only province in Canada without a poverty reduction plan, in 2015 the provincial government should enact a program to end poverty.
A full anti-poverty program, rising welfare and the minimum wage, providing low cost childcare and building social housing, would cost less than $4 billion a year but would save the $8 billion the province currently wastes on the costs of poverty. Ending poverty would save around $4 billion a year, create jobs and make BC a much happier place.
  The Poor People’s Radio ended with a minute of silence remembering the people who died of poverty in the last year.
  Food Bank use is increasing in BC, up 3.6% last year and still up 25% since the recession of 2008. Last year the CBC raised $655,147, which shows the generosity of BC people and sounds like a lot of money. However, this is only $6.73 for each of the 97,369 people who used Food Banks in 2014 – less than one day’s healthy eating!
 A recent report by Put Food in the Budget pointed out that in 2013 CBC sponsored 19 seasonal charity programs for Food Banks. These generated a total of 1,868,000 pounds of food which, when divided by the 1.7 million people who visit a Food Bank in Canada in a year, equals 1.1 pounds of food per person year. This is only one third of one day’s food needed for each recipient.
  We ask BC’s politicians to follow the old phrase “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”. Ask yourselves, how can you justify wasting money and making people live in poverty because of misfortune or having a very low paying job? It is time to do the right thing and in 2015 raise welfare to $1,500 a month and the minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Contact Raise the Rates:
Bill Hopwood: 604 738-1653, 778 686-5293 (cell) bill50@vcn.bc.ca       http://raisetherates.org/

Raise the Rates
www.raisetherates.org

Can you Live on $610 a month?
Justice not Charity


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A fabulous fundraiser

Mark this date on your calendar, scratch it on the wall,

Saturday, January 15, 2014
A fabulous fundraiser
for the
Carnegie Newsletter
Entertainment Extraordinaire, Silent Auction
at the Peretz School Auditorium


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SANDSTONE LADY

SANDSTONE LADY

Way down on the old east side
On Hastings at Main
There is a sandstone lady
Who braves the wind and rain
She’s a building of rare beauty
With her copper dome
And the people who come here
They say she feels like home.

She was built by them Masons
‘bout a hundred years ago
Back when things were simple
And lifwe was kind of slow
First she was a library
Then museum for the town
But when she was abandoned
You could say they let her down.

Chorus:
Yeah this old sandstone lady
She’s like a mother to us all
So stand up and say Carnegie
Ya beautiful old doll!

And then like the Phoenix
That rose up in the sun
She became a centre
For all the folks to come
Oh her doors are always open
And you are welcome in
Though your name be Chung,
        Valdez or Eagl
Mary, Joe or Jim.

And high overhead an eagle flies
And so does a snow white dove
One says you’ll find courage here
The other peace and love

Chorus:
Yeah this old sandstone lady
She’s like a mother to us all
So stand up and say Carnegie
Ya beautiful old doll!

Chorus:
Yeah this old sandstone lady
She’s like a mother to us all
So stand up and say Carnegie
Ya beau---, you beau---, you beau---
You beautiful old doll!
You beautiful old sandstone la—dy—

                                       Patrick

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Help with the NEW WEBSITE!
December 15, incidentally, is the 28th anniversary of my being its editor. It will also be the 657th edition (16-28 pages in 1200 copies, 23 times a year). Help in the Downtown Eastside, the free resource guide, is on #47 since 1991.  PRT

Dear Cindy,
               Please accept my thanks for permitting Sean to receive all the files in the Carnegie Newsletter section of CHODARR.
               At 62, computers are normal in daily life but there isn't one in the residence my wife & I share. When the paper started in 1986 it was done on an IBM Selectric (a typewriter (and yes, digital children, there was NO spellchecker)). This went on for the first 5-6 years, then a computer was gradually integrated into the paper's production. To date, however, it isn't done via desktop publishing; submissions are entered through Microsoft Office and formatted, printed, cut with scissors & pasted with glue. It works for me.
               I've been the volunteer editor since 1986 and still, everything except the actual printing - writing, poetry, locally-created graphic art, input, editing, layout, collation/stapling/ folding & distribution - is done for free by volunteers. This is why your granting of access to Sean Verhallen, our Youth Internship person, has been especially pleasing & appreciated. you did not put any kind of price or cost on as a necessary prerequisite!  It is so nice (literally "rare & special") when capitalism doesn't cloud human goodness.
               The Newsletter's online presence has been somewhat antiquated. The job description sent to the Vancouver Community Net's Internship program asked for someone to create a new, user-friendly website; to tutor [me] on all its aspects; to write a manual for future reference & training; to see if there is a way to get access to CHODARR's administration and somehow begin updating its database, since no such updating had been done since 2008. It was also mandatory that a way be found to transfer all the stuff on the then-current website at www.carnnews.org to the new site.
    The final caution on the j.d. was that the person have some knowledge of the Downtown Eastside, i.e. didn't accept media stereotypes, didn't think of poverty as a 'contagious' disease, didn't have phobias towards addicts or mental health consumers, etc. This has happened in the past, with young people just in their 3rd or 4th year or just graduated with a degree or very geeky with computers but not with people coming here and being petrified.
               I have no idea who you are, only that this email will go through SFU's computer. Perhaps you are still active there and might even be in attendance at the downtown campuses (Harbour Centre or Woodwards). If so, or even if not so, would you like to come to the Carnegie Centre at 401 Main(& Hastings), have a coffee or lunch - the food here is great! - and see the operation? The next issue will be published on Monday, December 15, incidentally the 28th anniversary of my being its editor. It will also be the 657th edition (16-28 pages in 1200 copies, 23 times a year). If this interests you, call me at 604-665-2289 or send an email a few days before. As a volunteer I don't have any set hours so may or may not miss a same-day message.
               Take care & thanks again.

                 Respectfully submitted,  PaulR  Taylor.

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Help save the Clifton Hotel for low income renters

 Help save the Clifton Hotel for low income renters

  Adriane Carr has put forward a motion at city council to preserve the Clifton Hotel on Granville St. as housing for low income people.  Specifically, the motion calls on city council to "inform the owner of the Clifton Hotel that the City will consider current renovation plans as conversions and require $15,000/room or welfare rate rental rates after renovations in lieu of the $15,000"; and "to work with the owner to find a non-profit operator and a subsidy so the rooms can remain available to people on welfare, disability and basic pension."
The motion will be dealt with on Dec. 17 at city council.
 We need people to come to city council and speak in favour of the motion to put some pressure on council to start saving SROs like this one,that are being gentrified.  The manager told Wendy Pedersen & I that the owner wants to rent out the renovated rooms for $900 a month to "international
 students."
To be able to speak at city council you need to register before hand by emailing here nicole.ludwig@vancouver.ca or calling 604 873 7191.  Say you want to speak at council on Carr's motion about the Clifton Hotel.
  SROs are crummy places to live & no one wants to have to live in them, but they are the last resort before homelessness. This year Vancouver had the highest homeless count ever.  No new government funded social housing has been announced since 2007.  And gentrifying owners are buying up hotels, evicting low income residents, renovating slightly, and then renting rooms out for $700 and up. Unless something is done to get new social housing and stop the eviction of SRO residents then homelessness will go up again next year.
  A lot of the points you can make are in the "whereas's" of the motion below.
 But the crux of the motion is that the city's SRA bylaw, section e of the definition of "conversion", allows the city to charge up to $15,000 per unit to landlords who convert their building.  For years the city has been saying that simply renovating a building is not converting.  But we are asking them to look carefully at section e of the definition which says if renovations have a "material effect on the enjoyment by permanent residents of their living accommodation” they are a conversion.    Obviously, if the Clifton's owners renovate the building and can then increase rents from the $400 range to $900, they are having a material effect on the enjoyment by permanent residents of their living accomodation."  Right now the Clifton is is deplorable shape, filthy, smelly, and needing fire and electrical upgrades, painting, cleaning, and much more.  So a major reno would have a material effect on enjoyment by permanent residents who have been suffering for years under current management.
  So when you speak at city council, you could
   1.  Say you support Councillor Carr's motion,
   2.. Say who you are and why you are interested in this
   3.  Talk about how bad homelessness is
   4.  Talk about the need to save the SROs until we can get decent self contained housing built for all sro residents and homeless people
   5.  Ask them to support the motion and define renovations that improve conditions for tenants as conversions
   6. Ask them to work with non profits & other levels of government to find subsidies to run renovated hotels.
   7.  Stick around at the podium for a few seconds to see if they have any questions.  
Thanks, if you have any questions or want any help writing a little speech, call Jean at 604 729 2380 or Wendy at 604 839 0379.


Protecting SRO Rooms in the Clifton Hotel
MOVER: Councillor Adriane Carr
SECONDER: Councillor Melissa de Genova
WHEREAS
1. There is a crisis in affordable housing in Vancouver for those at the lowest income levels who receive welfare shelter rate allowance of $375 per month for rent, many of whom live in the Downtown Eastside (DTES);
2. Vancouver had its highest homeless count ever this year and SROs are the last resort before homelessness;
3. The supply of housing at the shelter allowance rent—SROs in the DTES and downtown core—has precipitously declined. According to recent unpublished Carnegie Action Project research 78 percent of privately owned DTES hotel rooms rent for $425 and more, with 22 of SRO hotels having rents that are $500 or more and 9 with rents that are $700 or more, exacerbating the homeless crisis;
4. The Clifton Hotel, an SRO hotel on Granville Street, has been deteriorating for many years due to failure by the landlord to regularly undertake necessary maintenance and cleaning and is currently in major disrepair, despite some work done recently under a Standards of Maintenance order, with tenants living in unsafe, unclean and pest-infested conditions;
5. Major repairs are now required and proposed by the owner of the CliftonHotel, resulting in most of the hotel’s 74 rooms being now vacant and many of the residents of the 25 to 27 rooms that are currently occupied at a rent of $425 per month, accepting payment in exchange for ending their tenancy without a right of return upon completion of renovations by the landlord;
6. Paragraph 1.2(e) of the Single Room Accommodation Bylaw, No. 8733 defines “conversion” as "(e) a repair or alteration to a designated room or any improvement or fixture in it or a replacement of any such improvement or fixture, except for repairs or alterations that are minor in nature and have no material effect on the enjoyment by permanent residents of their living accommodation”;
7. The proposed renovations will have a material effect on the enjoyment by permanent residents of the Clifton, specifically by ending their tenancies and will allow the landlord to raise the rent by any amount following renovations, materially changing the occupancy of the building; and will allow the landlord to profit from his failure to properly maintain the Clifton by ending the tenancies of long-term tenants.
THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT:
1. The City of Vancouver inform the owner of the Clifton Hotel that the City will consider current renovation plans as conversions and require $15,000/room or welfare rate rental rates after renovations in lieu of the $15,000;
2. The City work with the owner to find a non-profit operator and a subsidy so the rooms can remain available to people on welfare, disability and basic pension.

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From the Library

From the Library

  On behalf of the Carnegie Library I wish everyone a Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa, Happy Festivus (if you’re a Seinfeld fan!) and a wonderful New Year! I hope you get a chance to share good food with a friend and surprise someone with a kind gift or gesture.
  To avoid festive overkill, I thought I would remind readers that December 10th was “International Human Rights Day,” which was adopted by the United Nations back in 1948.  Their motto this year is Human Rights 365, to imply that this is an issue to be recognized 365 days a year.  To honour this, consider some of these library materials here at Carnegie:
The American Way of Poverty (362.50973 A16a) by Sasha Abramsky
Bad Medicine: a judge’s struggle for justice in a First Nations community (340.092 R36b)  John Reilly
A Child is Not a Toy: voices of children in poverty (362.76 B35c) by Sheila Baxter
The Enough Moment: fight to end Africa’s worst human rights crimes (323.49096 P92e) by John Prendergast
Redress: Inside the Japanese Canadian call for justice (971.1004 M63r) by Roy Miki.
  At the same time, please balance the heavy reading with some lighter festive fare! We have a selection of Christmas stories, carol books, CDs, magazines, DVDs, etc.  Feel free to drop by our “Main & Hastings” meet-up at 10:30am on Tuesday Dec. 16th in the Classroom (level 3) Share a favourite holiday story!
                      Enjoy and be merry.

                                           Your librarian, Natalie

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I keep looking
I keep looking
for one
but ya know – one here, one there
hardly a cosmic truth
I look in the spaces
between galaxies
between subatomic particles
(that pesky god-particle
really pisses some off)
then, out of everywhere,
I am One
                                                          PRT

[top]

Your children are not your children.
Your children are not your children.
They are the sons and daughters
of Life's longing for itself.
They come through you but not from you,
and though they are with you,
yet they belong not to you.
You may give them your love,
but not your thoughts.
For they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies
but not their souls,
for their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow,
which you cannot visit
not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them,
but seek not to make them like you.
For life goes not backward,
nor tarries with yesterday.
                                                            Videha

[top]

The nite before

The nite before

T'was da night before welfare and all through da land
everybody was starving both woman and man
da minister of welfare was in bed but awake
he was getting some there so da checks they could wait

Then all of a sudden there arose such a clatter
"que pasa?" he yelled! "say what? Waz da matter?"
he jumped outta bed and through da kitchen he ran
tripped over da cat and knocked over da fan

He looked down da hallway and what did appear?
A binner, a native and a few a' their peers
a tired old woman her face full of woe
gave out a yell "hey cough up da doe!"

The minister pouted "I’m sorry I’m wrong"
but alas of course we've all heard that song
he gave out the cheques and he passed out stale beer
then he said with a sneer "see ya same time next year!"

                                             Mr. McBinner

[top]

Dear Carnegie News,

Dear Carnegie News,

  I realise what your problem is. You are operating with impeccable conduct and moral decency.
  It all began with a short article I wrote on rabbits. Paul, the editor, totally screwed it up and became a cripple.
  I have been somewhat crippled myself. I consider that he totally fucked up his brain waves in dealing with my diatribe, set himself up for an accident, which furthered my career in the looney bin.
  The whole thing is utter nonsense. Really, if you would open yourselves up, pretend that you are a station that can play looney tunes, and in the voice of bitter expertise – be not so concerned with complete sets, maybe someone would pay you for your good taste.
                                        Wendy Thompson

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WHO STOLE THE SPIRIT OF THE CARNEGIE
WHO STOLE THE SPIRIT OF THE CARNEGIE
WITH A CHRISTMAS TWIST
CHRISTMAS EVE – PART OF AN EVENING OF PERFORMANCES IN THE THEATRE
WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 24TH 8:45 PM
produced by No Mercy Productions in conjunction with the Carnegie Theatre Workshop

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Statement on World AIDS Day 2014 - Libby Davies MP
Statement on World AIDS Day 2014
Ms. Libby Davies (Van East, NDP)
: Mr. Speaker, on the occasion of World AIDS Day, we remember the countless victims of the AIDS epidemic, while paying tribute to the many who have devoted their professional work to advancement in treating HIV-AIDS, like Dr. Julio Montaner, whose groundbreaking “treatment as prevention” method has helped turn the tide on the global fight against HIV-AIDS.
  As we celebrate the many medical advances in combatting AIDS worldwide, it is strangely ironic that on this day, Bill C-2 also comes back to the House. This is the government's anti-safe injection site bill. If passed as written, this bill has the potential to undo a decade's worth of stemming the spread of HIV and Hep C among injection drug users. Research has clearly demonstrated that harm reduction prevents the spread of HIV-AIDS, and we in the NDP will continue to uphold the rights of individuals to health and well-being.
On this World AIDS Day, we salute the many organizations and advocates who work tirelessly for a world free of AIDS, both in Canada and globally.

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THE GOLDEN BIN

THE GOLDEN BIN

I pray this year that I will win
The chance to dive that golden bin
The golden bin it holds no tin
Has coffee brass and maybe gin
It just might hold a dream or two
A lotto ticket trips to the zoo
Tvs radios computers old
There's just no telling what it may hold
You'll know I’ve found the golden bin
For on my face will be a grin
A VCR maybe I’ve found
A brick of gold maybe a crown
One thing i know I’ll find no dope
The golden bin holds love and hope
It may be thick it may be thin
But still will be the golden bin
The golden bin is full of grace
It's full of love for every race
The golden bin is never locked
The golden bin is fully stocked
Maybe I’ll find some boots or socks
The golden bin it holds no rocks
From the east north south or wes
That golden bin will be the best
Unlike the uncaring city tart
The golden bin gives from the heart
In sun snow sleet or rain
It gives and gives with no pain
The goose that laid that golden egg
Knows that I won't need to beg
No needles in that golden bin
The golden bin someday I’ll win

                                          Mr. McBinner

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Sewing Shirts

Sewing Shirts

Only those white clouds are free
to soar beyond the factory window;
inside, grey dust scales
the cutter hacking out shirts,
flinging dismembered parts, inanimate
as dead dreams, into open boxes.
Here, life is taped, ruled
"At the double!": double seams
yoking body to arm; the double load
of outside job and housework, the double talk
of a radio playing "Workers' Playtime"
while women sweat for a minimum wage.
Their hands cling to a Singer
straining like a small, frantic beast
towards five o'clock and freedom
of a sort; life buttoned down
from eight to five, for fifty weeks a year
the stop-and-start
embrace of these whose limp arms hold
only the bone and flesh
of a five-day week plus compulsory overtime.
Their eternal home is this dead end
where St. Mary is a supervisor
with hennaed hair, steel eyeglasses
and a tongue whipping them forward
and God is a scissors-wielding boss
slashing seams and wages.
Neither the singer nor the song
these women
are only the necessary insert
between the dole and the rent
due Friday next,
and the young girls marry arm to body,
try to pin life down by the tail,
and dream of collaring
a husband, rattling out
short and long stitches: hopeful SOS
to that future Prince
faceless now as these headless ones
who will take them away from all this,
into a fairy world of wifedom
where life will be a seamless wonder
and the inside will be as perfect as the outside…
And the older women, wiser, turn away,
knowing that in a woman's world,
all hope hangs only by a thread
and they told the shirts and entomb
them tight in plastic, seeing
in these pale look-alikes
an image of themselves
boxed -in, straight-jacketed, branded
in cut-rate, throw-away packages.

                                       Jancis M Andrews
**When I was sixteen I worked full time in a shirt factory, sewing the sleeves to the shirt body. Recently, I saw a documentary on the garment industry and was depressed to see how little had changed.

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Spiritual Progress

Spiritual Progress

Everyone is self-taught
starvation started the deep teaching
re-learning to talk to walk to think to breathe
linking makes bodies from paper food
ideation opens dark to light
body keeps being linked to kept practices
mind keeps tweaking little flashes
that pass often for insight yet
handle as painless ease

Spirit is intuition personified
with hope & never giving up

waiting for        ahhhhhhhhhhh!

                                     paulr  taylor

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December 15, 2014